HIV-1 vaccine design through minimizing envelope metastability

Year
2018
Type(s)
Authors
He L, Kumar S, Allen JJ, Huang D, Lin X, Mann CJ, Saye-Francisco KL, Copps J, Sarkar A, Blizard GS, Ozorowski G, Sok D, Crispin M, Ward AB, Burton DR, Wilson IA*, Zhu J* (*Co-corresponding authors)
Source
Science Advances21 Nov 2018 : eaau6769
Url
http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaau6769
Bibtext
BibTeX
HIV-1 vaccine design through minimizing envelope metastability

By Linling He, Sonu Kumar, Joel D. Allen, Deli Huang, Xiaohe Lin, Colin J. Mann, Karen L. Saye-Francisco, Jeffrey Copps, Anita Sarkar, Gabrielle S. Blizard, Gabriel Ozorowski, Devin Sok, Max Crispin, Andrew B. Ward, David Nemazee, Dennis R. Burton, Ian A. Wilson, Jiang Zhu

Science Advances21 Nov 2018 : eaau6769

A coherent HIV-1 vaccine strategy addresses envelope stabilization, nanoparticle display, antibody response, and manufacture.

Abstract

Overcoming envelope metastability is crucial to trimer-based HIV-1 vaccine design. Here, we present a coherent vaccine strategy by minimizing metastability. For 10 strains across five clades, we demonstrate that the gp41 ectodomain (gp41ECTO) is the main source of envelope metastability by replacing wild-type gp41ECTO with BG505 gp41ECTO of the uncleaved prefusion-optimized (UFO) design. These gp41ECTO-swapped trimers can be produced in CHO cells with high yield and high purity. The crystal structure of a gp41ECTO-swapped trimer elucidates how a neutralization-resistant tier 3 virus evades antibody recognition of the V2 apex. UFO trimers of transmitted/founder viruses and UFO trimers containing a consensus-based ancestral gp41ECTO suggest an evolutionary root of metastability. The gp41ECTO-stabilized trimers can be readily displayed on 24- and 60-meric nanoparticles, with incorporation of additional T cell help illustrated for a hyperstable 60-mer, I3-01. In mice and rabbits, these gp140 nanoparticles induced tier 2 neutralizing antibody responses more effectively than soluble trimers.